Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Moves to codify US drones policy


The New York Times 24 November 2012 reports that with more than 300 drone strikes and some 2,500 people killed by the Central Intelligence Agency and the military since President Obama first took office, the administration is now pushing to make the rules formal and resolve internal uncertainty and disagreement about exactly when lethal action is justified.

NYT  reports:

Mr. Obama and his advisers are still debating whether remote-control killing should be a measure of last resort against imminent threats to the United States, or a more flexible tool, available to help allied governments attack their enemies or to prevent militants from controlling territory.

Though publicly the administration presents a united front on the use of drones, behind the scenes there is longstanding tension. The Defense Department and the C.I.A. continue to press for greater latitude to carry out strikes; Justice Department and State Department officials, and the president’s counterterrorism adviser, John O. Brennan, have argued for restraint, officials involved in the discussions say.

More broadly, the administration’s legal reasoning has not persuaded many other countries that the strikes are acceptable under international law. For years before the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, the United States routinely condemned targeted killings of suspected terrorists by Israel, and most countries still object to such measures.

But since the first targeted killing by the United States in 2002, two administrations have taken the position that the United States is at war with Al Qaeda and its allies and can legally defend itself by striking its enemies wherever they are found.

Read the full article here.

My thanks to Isabelle Roe for drawing this item to my attention.

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